Tag Archives: colour

Save On Printing By Choosing The Right Options!

save on printing

 

Save On Printing – What Can You Do?

 

1. Direct Mail

This can help you save on printing if you make sure everything is correct and accurate. This will need to be done before you ask a printer to print your letters off for you. If you had a database of 1000 people and for 650 of those you had an outdated address, you could have wasted money on 650 letters that didn’t even arrive to the intended people. Maintaining and updating your database is vital to save on printing when it comes to mailing your customers.

 

2. Paper

Choosing the right paper stock for your project can make the difference between how much you can save on printing. If you’re looking to mail as mentioned above, you wouldn’t need expensive paper, you could use inexpensive and uncoated paper. It would be best asking your printer which paper would best suit your project. It’s always great to save on printing, but if you end up using low cost paper on a project that you want to look good, you won’t give your print the ‘wow’ factor. This would most likely lead your target audience to ignore your print.

3. Colour

Using colour will increase the price of your printed product/s. It can impact on how much you save on printing, but using colour for your print where necessary would make it more appealing to your target audience. If you needed business cards or posters, colour would be needed. This is because it would attract more people to your piece of print. If it didn’t have colour, chances are people wouldn’t even take a second look at it. On the other hand, when it comes to print products like newsletters and daily menus, they could easily have no colour which would help you save on printing prices.

4. Digital Printing

Digital printing has a higher cost per piece of printed material compared to lithographic, because of this you may assume that the lithographic printing process is cheaper to use and allow you to save on printing. The truth is, it might not be. Digital printing takes a lot less time to set up as the printing plates do not have to be made. Making the printing plates is a lengthy and expensive step within the lithographic printing process, which would be unsuitable for short print runs as the setup cost would make Lithographic more expensive. Digital printing would help you save on printing if you’re looking to run a short print job. It offers a faster turnaround, faster setups, variable data printing and much more. If you would like to learn a little more about digital printing, please click on the header.

5. Lithographic Printing

In short terms, the lithographic printing process is excellent for the longer print runs. It will help you save on printing when compared to running a long print run using the digital printing process. This is because each printed piece is more expensive using the digital printing process, but you have to take into account the time and money involved in the setup for the lithographic process, before you can make any judgements on which process offers you the better value for your project. Longer print runs on the lithographic printing process are perfect and will help you save on printing. This is because once the setup costs have been surpassed, it will be more expensive per piece of print from there on out for the digital process.

We hope these easy to follow tips help you select the right options for your project, whilst also helping you to save on printing.

CMYK Explained!

CMYK (Cyan – Magenta – Yellow – Black)

CMYK

CMYK is a color model in which all colors are described as a combination of  Cyan-Magenta-Yellow & Black.

RGB (Red-Green & Blue) & CMYK

CMYK is the colour model used for printing and is displayed on products like brochures and business cards. RGB (Red, Green & Blue) is the colour model used for devices such as a computer monitors or screens as they can only be viewed with natural or produced light.

 Additive Colour & Subtractive Colour:

The RGB colour model is based on projecting light to create colour, this is referred to as additive colour. When all three colours are combined (Red, green & blue), it creates white. This is the case for devices such as your computer and TV screens. This means that for the RGB colour model, black is the absence of all colour.

When CMY (Cyan, magenta & yellow) are mixed they create black. This is the case for most printed media such as business cards, brochures, posters, etc, as CMYK displays better on paper. The pigments of CMYK are printed in small dots and if you were to take a magnifying glass to the paper, you’d see that it would mainly be just a bunch of small dots spread out across the print. Opposed to the RGB colour model, for the CMYK colour model white is the absence of all colour.

Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign all provide presets recommended for CMYK press setups which is very useful. You can also find out how to convert RGB to CMYK very easily with a quick internet search.

In conclusion, whenever you are designing for print, make sure that it’s in the CMYK colour model. Otherwise the final printed product will not look as it did when it was being displayed in RGB on your computer screen.

Why Does K Stand For Black?

This may sound like a very simple thing to solve with a quick Google search, but the actual answer has an element of the unknown to it. There are two common answers for why K stands for Black and here they are:

1. Wikipedia’s description of why K is Black is “The “K” in CMYK stands for key because in four-color printing, cyan, magenta, and yellow printing plates are carefully keyed, or aligned, with the key of the black key plate.” This is because the black plate in four-colour printing pushes the contrast and creates detail.

2. The second answer that some will give you is that it was to prevent blue being easily confused with the B for black term. This answer is considered a myth, but there is some logical reasoning behind why printers would change B to K because of the confusion between blue and black.  The reasoning behind this is if the press was loaded with blue ink at the end of the day, the entire job would have to be started over. Which, as you can imagine would cause quite the frustration amongst the printers. So it could be that key was a random word picked out of no where to stop the confusion between blue and black.

Maybe the real answer will never be known, but it certainly is a mystery for the printing industry.

 

How Do Colours Affect You?

The Psychology Behind Colours

 

Choosing colours for their psychological properties may not seem that important to you, but we assure you, they are. The colours you are using could actually represent emotions and feelings that you do not want your brand representing.

 But Don’t worry you don’t have to be a Psychologist to understand the psychological properties behind each colour. We have found some great links that do a brilliant job of explaining in depth the positive and negative emotions and feelings that colours can represent.

true-colors

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_psychology – Wikipedia does a great job of explaining all the different aspects of the psychology of colours to give you a more detailed understanding of colour psychology.

http://www.colour-affects.co.uk/psychological-properties-of-colours – Colour affects goes a lot more in depth in terms of the actual emotions and feelings that each colour represents, they also provide a great description for each colour too.

http://www.ddwcolor.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/colour-infographic-2.jpg – This infographic goes a step further and starts to explore different shades of colour and explaining the little differences that each shade has.

After reading this you may want to assess the colours you use to see if what they represent is in line with what you want your company/brand representing.